Going Beyond the Bechdel Test

Going Beyond the Bechdel Test Most people nowadays have at least heard of the Bechdel Test. If you haven't, here's a primer: According to this website, the Bechdel test is a simple way of analyzing film, television, or literature using the following three criteria:

(1) it has to have at least two women in it, who (2) who talk to each other, about (3) something besides a man.

The test was popularized by Alison Bechdel's comic Dykes to Watch Out For, in a 1985 strip called The Rule. For a nice video introduction to the subject please check out The Bechdel Test for Women in Movies onfeministfrequency.com.

The aforementioned website includes a list of several movies that pass the test--for example, Captain America: Civil War, Finding Dory, and Ghostbusters. Some books that past the test include The Hunger Games, The Book Thief, and The Fault in Our Stars. As for television shows, think Orphan Black, Scandal, and Parks and Recreation. I could go on, but you get the idea.

Recently, there's been a lot of talk about the way women are represented in the media. The commercial and popular success of the Ghostbusters reboot, as well as that of female-led movies like the Oscar-winning Mad Max: Fury Road, proves that people want to see women in more prominent roles. For decades, women have been shoehorned into one-dimensional, stereotypical roles that reinforce outdated perspectives and encourage sexism and misogyny. The Bechdel Test is arguably more relevant than ever.

But we should strive to write beyond the Bechdel Test. Instead of settling for the bare minimum--writing novels that meet these three criteria--we should work to surpass them. This means not only writing female characters that have conversations about subjects other than men, but writing female characters who are real, have hopes and dreams and goals and weaknesses and flaws; women with hobbies and careers and relationships and souls.

It's not enough to write to appease the Bechdel Test. We have to move forward, rise above, do better. More than anything, we have to go beyond the Bechdel Test. We owe it to not only future generations, but also to ourselves. That's what keeps me writing. How about you?

What do you think?

Tweet tweet:

What does it mean to write real women? @brianawrites weighs in. (Click to tweet)